FAQ's

What is the UW Data Repository?
What's the difference between the UW Data Repository and the UW PetaLibrary?
Why should I use it?
What does it cost?
Are there file size/format limitations?
What kinds of data do you accept?
Can I host my website or desktop computer backups here?
What if I want to deposit data elsewhere?
How do I submit data?
How do I write an acceptable ReadMe file?
How do I/others cite my data?
What's a DOI?
What's an Embargo?
I have more questions, who should I contact?

Questions

What is the UW Data Repository?

The data repository is intended to be a storage archive of research data produced at UW. Data can be in support of a publication or publications in their own right.

What's the difference between the UW Data Repository and the UW PetaLibrary?

The Data Repository and the PetaLibrary work hand-in-hand. The PetaLibrary is made up of software and hardware that store the data and the Repository serves as the public interface and dissemination platform through which publicly shared research data can be accessed. The UW Libraries maintains the "Curation" layer of this system including publication and preservation, while ARCC is responsible for the "Commons" layer where working data lives.

Why should I use it?

We aim to make data archiving and submission as simple and as useful as possible through a suite of services offered to UW researchers at no cost. It is, of course, your choice if you choose to deposit your research data elsewhere, but be aware that most third party data repositories charge a fee.

What does it cost?

The UW Libraries offers this service to campus at no cost, much as the Libraries do with access to thousands of information sources including books, journals, and databases. This is not to be confused, however, with storage costs set by ARCC for working data. See ARCC's Pricing Structure at the bottom of the page.

Are there file size/format limitations?

Currently there are no file size or format limitations. However, we do encourage users to generate data in standardized and non-proprietary formats for re-use in the future.

What kinds of data do you accept?

We won't accept your cat pictures, unless they're really cool (actually, we won't)! All kidding aside, this service is for research data only. While we understand that there can be numerous forms of research data, it must be research-oriented. Please see our Data Collection Policy for details.

Can I host my website or desktop computer backups here?

No, this is not a service for storage of that kind of data. If you need that sort of storage, check with UW-IT.

What if I want to deposit data elsewhere?

It is completely up to you and your funding requirements where you store your data. There are numerous data repository services in existence for most disciplines.

Be aware however, that many of them charge significant amounts of money for that service whereas this is free to UW researchers.

How do I submit data?

Follow the instructions on the How to Submit data page.

How do I write an acceptable ReadMe file?

Please see this Readme template.

In general, you should make your Readme useful enough that in 12 months, after you may have forgotten how and what you did, that you can refer back to your Readme file and be able to re-create everything you did to generate your data. This is also a resource for others who may be looking at your data and have no familiarity with it at all.

How do I/others cite my data?

There are numerous citation formats below is a suggested data citation format, but in any case, please include the doi in your citation.

Please cite the original publication:

Ogden, F. L., W. Lai, R. C. Steinke, J. Zhu, C. A. Talbot, and J. L. Wilson (2015), A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method, Water Resour. Res., 51, 4282–4300, doi:10.1002/2015WR017126.

Additionally, please cite Data package:

Ogden, Fred L. (2015) Data from: Infiltration modeling breakthrough. University of Wyoming Research Data Repository. doi:10.15786/M2WC70

What's a DOI?

A digital object identifier (DOI) is a type of persistent identifier used to uniquely identify objects. The DOI system is particularly used for electronic documents such as journal articles. The DOI system began in 2000 and is managed by the International DOI Foundation. DOIs serve as permanent links to objects using a resolver such as dx.doi.org. So we use persistent links to our resources in the following format:

What's an Embargo?

An Embargo period is a length of time when author, publisher, or other party wishes to restrict access to an object. Typically the author submits a dataset to the repository but only the metadata will be made openly accessible during the embargo period. Once the embargo period expires, the full dataset download is released to the open web. Embargo periods vary between a few months to a few years. DOIs remain valid throughout the process.

I have more questions, who should I contact?

Please refer to our Contact Us page